Human Factors and Ergonomics Society

2009 and Prior Meetings


Meeting Agendas

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PRIOR MEETINGS

Christmas Pizza Party and HFES Career Discussion

Dec 11, 2009, 5:00 – 6:30

Sponsored by
Western New York Chapter of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society

Location
RIT Building 70 Room 2400 (B. Thomas Golisano College of Computing and Information Sciences) Park in Lot J. See campus map at http://inside.rit.edu/maps/

Abstract
Join us on Friday, Dec 11 for a Christmas Pizza party and an informal discussion about HFES careers! We will have a round robin format. Anyone who’s interested will be invited to share career insights and experiences with the group. Topics of interest include how you got into your career, descriptions of the various jobs you’ve held in the HFES area, and career-related insights you’ve gathered along the way: What has been your best/worst career experience? What have you learned? What is the best career advice you’ve ever received? What advice do you have for people considering a career in human factors or HCI?

Special invitations are extended to students or anyone else who is considering a career in a human factors or HCI-related field.

Pizza, wings, and soda will be provided.

COST: Members & Students – no cost; Non-members - $5 payable at the door

RSVP: Contact Anne Haake by December 1 , arh at it.rit.edu


TIME DELAYS AND SYSTEM RESPONSE TIMES
IN HUMAN-COMPUTER INTERACTION

Noah Stupak - Eastman Kodak

October 7, 2009
Presentation: 6:00 pm, Networking: 7:00 pm.

Sponsored by the Western New York Chapter of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society

Location
RIT Building 70 Room 2400 (B. Thomas Golisano College of Computing and Information Sciences)
Park in Lot J. See campus map at http://inside.rit.edu/maps/

Abstract
This study sought to determine a type of graphical representation of system response time that would be most beneficial to the user in terms of task performance. Specifically, he examined which type of progress bar would allow the user to return to working with the system most efficiently while performing other, concurrent tasks, and how well the user performed these tasks. The different types of progress indicators studied included segmented and continuous progress presentations, and linear, accelerating, and decelerating progress behaviors. The results indicate that different representations of response time affected performance on both tasks. The results also show that different progress indicator speeds and types should be used depending on the desired effect of the progress indicator on users.

Bio
Noah is currently employed at Eastman Kodak as a Human Factors Specialist, primarily working on digital still cameras. He recently completed the Applied Experimental Engineering Psychology Master’s program at RIT where he also received his undergraduate degree. The work he will present is his Master’s thesis.

COST: Members & Students – no cost; Non-members - $5 payable at the door

RSVP: Contact Anne Haake by Oct 5 , anne.haake at rit.edu

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Human Factors in an Agile Development Process


Presented by:
Mike Gerard, IBM; Carolyn Zacks, TK Software

Sponsored by: Western New York Chapter Human Factors and Ergonomics Society

Abstract: Agile software development enables rapid software development with minimal documentation. Software iterations can be as quick as daily. We will have a panel discussion on what Agile means from the perspective of a usability professional trying to design an easy to use product.

About the Speakers
Michael Gerard
is a Usability Engineer at IBM and frequently works on software projects using Agile. Mike’s educational background is in Industrial Engineering and Human Factors. He holds a B.S. in Engineering Design from Tufts University, a M.S. in Industrial Engineering from Auburn University, and a Ph.D. in Industrial Engineering from University of Michigan. Mike is a member of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society and past president and vice-president of the Western New York HFES Chapter. He has published 6 refereed journal articles, 10 conference proceedings and has reviewed articles for several journals including Human Factors and Ergonomics. Mike is also an occasional Adjunct Professor at Rochester Institute of Technology and has taught courses on Human Factors, Systems Safety Engineering, and Advanced Topics in Ergonomics and Human Factors.

Carolyn Zacks is a User Experience Architect & Designer at TK Software, an independent UX consulting company. She works with software engineers at companies around the world where quick iterations of software releases are critical to product success. Carolyn specializes in designing, prototyping, and testing the user experience for products and services using human factors and systems engineering principles. She also has extensive experience in user centered research, interaction design and human factors product development. Her experience includes Multimodal UI research, Mobile Imaging research, User Interface Design for both products and software, and Mobile Device Interaction Design (including phones and digital cameras). She has won awards for her digital camera UI designs and holds 7 patents in UI designs for digital cameras and communication applications. Carolyn holds BS and MS degrees in Industrial Engineering from the University at Buffalo, as well as a Ph.D. in Industrial and Systems Engineering from Virginia Tech. She is a member of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society and past chair and past program chair of the Product Design Technical Group as well as current vice-president and past treasurer of the Western New York HFES Chapter.


DATE/TIME: June 17, 2009 @ 5:00 pm – 6:30pm.

PLACE: RIT Building 70 (B. Thomas Golisano College of Computing and Information Sciences)Room 2400 (Information Technology Conference Room – 2nd floor) Park in Lot J. See campus map at http://inside.rit.edu/maps/

COST: Members & Students – no cost; Non-members - $5 payable at the door

RSVP: Contact Anne Haake by June 15, arh at it.rit.edu


Design and Development of the Kodak Zi6
Digital Video Camera

Chris Hahn
Eastman Kodak

Dec 2, 2008
Presentation: 5:30 pm, Networking: 6:30 pm.

Sponsored by the Western New York Chapter of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society

Location

RIT Building 70 Room 2400 (B. Thomas Golisano College of Computing and Information Sciences)

Park in Lot J. See campus map at http://inside.rit.edu/maps/

Abstract

The Zi6 digital video camera is a new product from Eastman Kodak, released 09/08. Being the “initial” launch of a new product in a budding market space, the User Experience team was left with lots of room and options to explore while developing the interaction models and workflows for the device.

Rapid prototyping, usability testing, heuristic evaluations, and “gut feel” are some of the tools often used when dealing with a demanding product development life cycles. This project review and discussion will reveal one of the most rewarding experiences I have had while working on a commercial product. I hope you enjoy

Bio

Chris is a somewhat young but very enthusiastic professional practicing and preaching his craft of User Centered Design and Usability Engineering in the local Rochester area. He is currently a Senior HF Engineer at Eastman Kodak working in their Digital Capture and Devices / User Experience Group, where his primary role is the lead HF engineer for the Digital Video Camera portfolio. His most recent product release was the Zi6 pocket video camera.

Chris has held many titles throughout his professional career including: Creative Director, Information Architect, User Interface Designer, Adjunct Professor, Freelance Graphic & UI Consultant.

Chris holds a MS in Electronic Publishing, and a BFA in Advertising Photography from Rochester Institute of Technology. Chris lives in the Rochester area with his wife and two sons.

COST: Members & Students – no cost; Non-members - $5 payable at the door

RSVP: Contact Anne Haake by Nov 25 , arh at it.rit.edu

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Ergonomic Injury Prevention in Healthcare

Valerie F. Beecher, MS, AEP
Ergonomics Specialist
SUNY Upstate Medical University

October 16, 2008
Presentation: 5:00 pm, Networking: 6:00 pm.

Sponsored by the Western New York Chapter of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society

Location
RIT Building 70 Room 2400 (B. Thomas Golisano College of Computing and Information Sciences)
Park in Lot J. See campus map at http://inside.rit.edu/maps/

Abstract
In 2006, seven out of the top ten occupations for musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) indicated in the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) summary statistics are occupations found in health care, with nurse aides ranking second and registered nurses ranking fifth. Healthcare facilities and healthcare workers in the United States are obviously impacted by the disturbing trends of increasing frequency and severity of work-related MSDs as well as all of the unique ergonomic hazards associated with providing healthcare services. Valerie Beecher will discuss the role of an ergonomics program in a healthcare institution to prevent injuries, including some of the latest engineering controls exclusive to healthcare environments.

Bio
Valerie Beecher is an Associate Ergonomics Professional who earned both a Master of Science and a Bachelor of Science in Industrial Engineering from University at Buffalo.

Valerie Beecher is currently the Ergonomics Specialist for SUNY Upstate Medical University, including University Hospital, in Syracuse, having responsibility for upward of six-thousand employees involved in every aspect of a medical and teaching institution including medical research and laboratories, health care delivery, office work, information management, maintenance, grounds keeping, housekeeping, and telecommunications. She oversees all ergonomic-related activities of University Hospital and the University. At Upstate, Valerie is responsible for the development and implementation of ergonomic policies, procedures and guidelines, including safe patient handling and movement, conducting ergonomic assessments of work areas, and educating the workforce in proper ergonomic concepts with an emphasis on particular tasks. Valerie is a member of the New York State Zero Lift Task Force. She also serves as a member of the National and Western New York Human Factors and Ergonomics Society.

Prior to coming to SUNY Upstate, Valerie worked as an Ergonomist for Duke University and the Duke University Health System in Durham, NC. Her additional work experience and consulting work includes ergonomics in manufacturing, telecommunications and office settings.

COST: Members & Students – no cost; Non-members - $5 payable at the door

RSVP: Contact Anne Haake by October 10, arh at it.rit.edu


Human Factors/Ergonomics Pioneers:
An Interview with Harry L. Davis

A video created by Keith Karn, Chris Koch, and Stan Caplan

Video will be introduced by Keith Karn
Human Factors Engineer at Eastman Kodak, and friend of Harry Davis

September 30, 2008
Video: 5:00pm-6:00pm, Networking: 6:00pm – 6:30pm.

Sponsored by the Western New York Chapter of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society

Location
RIT Building 70 Room 2400 (B. Thomas Golisano College of Computing and Information Sciences) Park in Lot J. See campus map at http://inside.rit.edu/maps/

Abstract
The WNY HFES chapter will kick off the fall season with a video interview of an internationally recognized pioneer in the field of Human Factors and Ergonomics. In this informative and insightful interview, Harry L. Davis recounts some of the major events in his human factors and ergonomics (HF/E) career. Harry, now a fellow of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, was a co-founder of the first HF/E department devoted to nonmilitary applications in U.S. industry: the Human Factors Group at Eastman Kodak Company in Rochester, New York. To inform his work of improving manufacturing jobs at Kodak, Harry participated in the 1957 founding meeting of the Human Factors Society in Tulsa, Oklahoma. He went on to co-found the Human Factors Group at Kodak, along with Charles Miller in 1960.

The Kodak human factors group flourished under Harry’s management as he expanded its scope to include not only the study of various types of jobs but also user-centered product design. Harry hired people with a wide variety of backgrounds such as experimental psychology, industrial engineering, computer science, and physiology, fostering a multidisciplinary approach that influenced not only the culture at Kodak, but the entire profession. The group hosted many tours and became a model for other companies that were creating human factors groups. The publication of the two-volume text, Ergonomic Design for People at Work, in the 1980s brought the group into prominence.

Harry encouraged his employees to participate actively in the profession through the Society. He served HFES with dedication as secretary- treasurer (1973–1974), on various committees (1973–1986), as member of Executive Council (1977–1983), and as president (1984–1985). He also served the profession at the international level as Secretary General (1979–1985) and president (1985–1988) of the International Ergonomics Association.

After his retirement from Kodak in 1986, Harry established a consulting business, Ergonomic Solutions at Work, and operated a retail store called My Aching Back. He expressed his passion for helping people through his HF/E work to the very end of his life, even working from his hospital bed. This interview was conducted shortly before his death in 2003.

Through this interview, the viewer gains an appreciation for the challenges in establishing credibility for the HF/E field, learns of a compelling personal history, and perhaps can relate to many of the same issues facing researchers and practitioners today. The video is appropriate for undergraduate and graduate students in the field as well as professionals interested in the roots of the human factors/ergonomics profession.

COST:
Members & Students – no cost; Non-members - $5 payable at the door

RSVP:
Contact Anne Haake by Sept 22, arh0356 at it.rit.edu

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June 8, 2008

Design for Accessibility and Section 508

Presented by: Michael Gerard of IBM

Date/Time: June 18, 2008:  Presentation: 5:00 pm, Networking: 6:00 pm.

Location
RIT Building 70 -  Room 2400 (B. Thomas Golisano College of Computing and Information Sciences)
Park in Lot J. See campus map at http://inside.rit.edu/maps/

Abstract
One of the primary goals of human factors is to design for as much of the population as possible. We usually set a cut off at 95 percent and decide to focus on that percentage of the population. We typically ignore designing for users who are disabled. The disabled population in the United States is approximately 20%. This means that our initial design goal of 95% is really something closer to 75%. We will discuss how and why designing for accessibility is important. We will also discuss Section 508, a government accessibility guideline.

Bio
Michael Gerard is a Usability Engineer at IBM in User Centered Design Services, focusing on usability of internal IBM projects. He also serves as an occasional external consultant and recently provided some Section 508 Consulting to Kodak.

Mike’s educational background is in Industrial Engineering and Human Factors. He holds a B.S. in Engineering Design from Tufts University, a M.S. in Industrial Engineering from Auburn University, and a Ph.D. in Industrial Engineering from University of Michigan. His doctoral research was supported by various organizations including: the Office Ergonomics Research Committee (OERC), the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), U.S. Postal Service, and Aetna.

Mike is a member of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society and past president and vice-president of the HFES Western New York Chapter. He has published 6 refereed journal articles, 10 conference proceedings and has reviewed articles for several journals including Human Factors and Ergonomics. Mike is also an occasional Adjunct Professor at Rochester Institute of Technology and has taught courses on Human Factors, Systems Safety Engineering, and Advanced Topics in Ergonomics and Human Factors.


COST:
Members & Students – no cost; Non-members - $5 payable at the door

RSVP: Contact Anne Haake by June 16th, arh at it.rit.edu


May 28, 2008

Innovation: Lessons from Experience

Presented by: Richard C. Notargiacomo

President: RCN Consulting Chairman and President: Product Development and Management Association

Date/Time: May 28, 2008 Presentation: 5:00pm-6:00pm, Networking: 6:00pm – 6:30pm.

Sponsored by the Western New York Chapter of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society

Location RIT Building 70 Room 2400 (B. Thomas Golisano College of Computing and Information Sciences) Park in Lot J. See campus map at http://inside.rit.edu/maps/

Richard NotargiacomoAbstract Look at any innovation process flow diagram and you’ll see essentially the same things: a phase that identifies new opportunities usually through a form of brainstorming, a phase that develops the best of these into fully articulated business proposals, and a phase that brings the best of these to market. The diagram also includes some form of selection process between each of the phases. All in all a pretty simple and straightforward process that promises great rewards at the end. Yet, if it’s that simple, why aren’t we all reaping those great rewards?

In this presentation we will explore the lessons learned from over two decades of experience in innovation – both within the context of large companies and in smaller ones. The lessons will focus on elements in the execution of the process, some of which may seem obvious, but nevertheless will require significant levels of discipline and persistence to implement. Links to the 2004 Product Development and Management Association’s Comparative Performance Assessment Study (CPAS) will be noted, where applicable.

Bio Rich Notargiacomo is a seasoned new products and innovation executive recognized for having a broad range of capabilities developed over thirty years. Rich has managed product development for three businesses - “touching” over 200 new products and services. He has also managed sections of a corporate innovation center responsible for identifying new business opportunities and developing comprehensive business proposals. During his career he has had a sequence of assignments with increasing responsibility in such varied functions as product development, innovation, marketing, manufacturing, operations, business and product management, strategic planning, and technology management. He has worked all phases of new products from strategy development through product discontinuance and is able to speak the language of all involved in new products and innovation.

Rich serves as Chairman and President of the Product Development and Management Association. This group is an international professional association comprised of over 3600 people engaged in product development and innovation. Rich consults with companies on innovation and product development, and coaches entrepreneurs and small business owners. He also serves as an adjunct faculty member at Rochester Institute of Technology’s E. Philip Saunders College of Business where he teaches undergraduate and graduate level courses in strategy and small business consulting.

Rich holds an MBA in Marketing from the Simon Business School of the University of Rochester , a BS in Chemical Engineering from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, and New Product Development Professional certification from the Product Development and Management Association. He is also a graduate of Coach University ’s Coach’s Training Program and the Leadership Development Program at the Center for Creative Leadership.

COST: Members & Students – no cost; Non-members - $5 payable at the door

RSVP: Contact Anne Haake by May 27, arh0356 at it.rit.edu

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April 22, 2008

Participatory Design of Academic Libraries


Presented by: Nancy Fried Foster - University of Rochester

Sponsored by:  WNY HFES

Location/Times:

  • RIT Building 70 Room 2400 (B. Thomas Golisano College of Computing and Information Sciences)
  • 5:00pm – 5:30pm. Networking
  • 5:30pm – 6:30pm. Presentation
  • Park in Lot J. See campus map at http://inside.rit.edu/maps/

Abstract:
At the University of Rochester, we conduct research on how students and faculty members do their academic work. We also include these library patrons in the design of library spaces, services, and technologies. In addition to an overview of this work, the presentation includes a description of some of our methods, and video clips from a current study.

About the Speaker:
Nancy Fried FosterNancy Fried Foster is an applied anthropologist with a doctorate from Columbia University. She has conducted research in the Amazon and Papua New Guinea as well as in educational and community organizations in the US and England. She is currently Lead Anthropologist at the University of Rochester’s River Campus Libraries where she conducts work-practice studies of faculty, staff and students and runs multi-disciplinary and participatory design processes.

 

COST: Members & Students – no cost; Non-members - $5 payable at the door

RSVP: Contact Anne Haake by April 15.  Email:  arh at it.rit.edu


March 26, 2008

http://wiki.laptop.org/images/thumb/6/6c/Green_and_white_machine.jpg/200px-Green_and_white_machine.jpg                          One Laptop per Child,  
an education project

the $100 laptop that is changing the world

Show & Tell, Look, Listen & Learn, Touch & Feel, Give & Take

 

An afternoon workshop with OLPC Rochester, NY leading to an evening meeting of the WNY HFES


Presented by:  
Frederick Grose, MPH, CIH and collaborators 

Location:
RIT Building 70 Room 2400 (B. Thomas Golisano College of Computing and Information Sciences)
Park in Lot J.  See campus map at http://inside.rit.edu/maps/

Abstract

One Laptop per Child, the OLPC project, is a non-profit association created by faculty members of the MIT Media Lab in 2005.  The association oversees the Children’s Machine project and construction and deployment of the XO, the $100 Laptop, designed to “revolutionize how we educate the world's children,” including those with limited energy and other infrastructure resources.  While they emphasize that OLPC is an education project, their strategy is to promote worldwide collaboration on the development of an open-source computing and communication platform.  The platform would grow to accelerate learning in whole communities and among all associated with the project.  Their ambitious goals and advanced, but low-cost, and energy-efficient hardware and software have captured the imaginations of hundreds of thousands of people.  In November 2007 they started mass production of the XO laptop, and the pioneers of the next wave of worldwide computing seem to be in the making!

Timeline

1-5 pm    Drop In (at any time - All are welcome), Check Things Out, Get to Know Each Other, Try Things Out

  1:00   doors open: set up XOs & networking; invite others to do likewise, casual introductions.

~1:45   Identify interests or topic groups among attendees, suggest that they gather and self-organize.  Possibly:

XO Mesh network

XO Activities

XO Human Interface Guidelines

OLPC project areas

XO emulated on VMWare Server 2.0 beta on Windows Vista32

Sugar on Ubuntu 7.10

~2:30   (or as seems timely) - Break (popcorn popper) Report discoveries, suggestions, raise questions.  Address questions, summarize and document on boards, redirect, regroup, or shuffle among topics as desired.

~3:15   (or as seems timely) - Repeat previous step as appropriate.

~4:00   finalize additional demonstrations & topics for 5:00 pm WNY HFES meeting; topic groups summarize items learned, open questions, plans, and report same on wiki and on board in classroom.

4:30     Refreshments (sandwiches for full-day attendees), greet arriving HFES attendees, personal networking.

5-6:00 pm   WNY HFES Meeting time

5:00     HFES meeting introductions, Facilitator’s comments on OLPC project, screen demos, explain theme, begin to answer new questions.

~5:30   Identify any OLPC topic groups present; have attendees get up to mill around and exercise theme actions.

6-9:50 pm   Keith Karn's Usability Testing Class

About the Facilitator

Frederick Grose volunteers for the OLPC project.  He served for 27 years at Eastman Kodak Company in Rochester, NY as an industrial hygienist, asbestos hygiene manager, workplace epidemiology associate, health, safety, & chemical information systems architect & programmer, and ergonomics associate.  Over his career at Kodak, he was the responsible industrial hygienist for significant tours of duty with Synthetic Chemicals, Roll Coating, & Photochemicals Divisions, and the Chemical Manufacturing, Construction, Maintenance, Facilities, Engineering, and Research & Development Organizations.  He helped developed Kodak's asbestos control program, occupational exposure tracking systems, and exposure monitoring and analysis systems for historic and active cohorts of workers exposed to methylene chloride.  He developed and delivered health education sessions for thousands of people working with asbestos and other hazardous physical, chemical, biological, or mechanical agents.  Frederick is a Certified Industrial Hygienist, a Master of Public Health (University of California, Berkeley), and a Bachelor of Science in chemistry (University of California, Riverside).  For most of his final 6 years at Kodak, he worked as an ergonomics associate, helping industrial clients to develop, understand, and implement ergonomic solutions that improve jobs and workplaces.
 

For HFES Meeting (5-6 pm) Only:
      Cost: Members & Students – no cost; Non-members - $ 5 payable at the door RSVP:
      Contact: Jennifer Dyck by 19 March, 716-673-3828, Jennifer.Dyck at fredonia.edu

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February 26, 2008

Reactions to Electronic Monitoring

Presented by: Dr. Laurel McNall, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of Psychology - State University of New York College at Brockport

Location:
 
RIT Building 70 Room 2400 (B. Thomas Golisano College of Computing and Information Sciences)
5:00pm – 6:30pm. Networking before the meeting, 5:00pm – 5:30pm.
Park in Lot J. See campus map at http://inside.rit.edu/maps/

Abstract
Technological advances have led to profound changes in the way employees' performance is assessed in the workplace. Managers can now monitor subordinate activities through the use of electronic monitoring systems. Electronic performance monitoring (EPM) can be defined as systems in which electronic technologies are used to collect, store, analyze, and report the actions or performance of individuals or groups on the job. As more and more employers rely on electronic technology and the types of available monitoring devices increases, it becomes increasingly important to understand employees' reactions to EPM. In my research, I've started with the premise that technology itself is neutral; it is not so much the monitoring technology that is a problem but how the system is designed, implemented, and used that affects workers' reactions and overall system effectiveness. In this talk, I will describe a study I conducted on employee reactions to electronic monitoring in a call center environment. I will also discuss some preliminary work on a newer form of electronic monitoring which uses global positioning systems (GPS) and other telecommunication technologies to track the location and movements of employees whose work takes them outside the confines of the company's facilities.

About the Speaker
Dr. Laurel McNall is an Assistant Professor of Psychology at the State University of New York College at Brockport where she teaches industrial/organizational psychology and social psychology. Her research interests include technology in the workplace, worker attitudes, work-family issues, and performance appraisal. Dr. McNall was formerly employed as a Consultant at The Group for Organizational Effectiveness in Albany, NY. She earned a Ph.D. in industrial/organizational psychology from the University at Albany, State University of New York in 2005, where she received the Distinguished Doctoral Dissertation Award for her work on electronic performance monitoring. She also holds a B.A. in psychology, /magna cum laude/, from Canisius College.

COST: Members & Students – no cost; Non-members - $5 payable at the door

RSVP: Contact Jennifer Dyck by February 19, 716-673-3828, Jennifer.Dyck at fredonia.edu


For 2009 and prior year's events and meetings detail, please click here.


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December 11, 2007

Designing Technology for Everyday Life


Sponsored by: WNY HFES
Presented by: Carman Neustaedter, Ph.D.
Kodak Research Labs

Location
RIT Building 70 Room 2400 (B. Thomas Golisano College of Computing and Information Sciences)
5:30pm – 6:30pm. Networking after the meeting, 6:30pm – 7pm.
Park in Lot J. See campus map at http://inside.rit.edu/maps/

Abstract
Technology is all around us, affecting most aspects of our everyday lives. With this ubiquity comes a need to understand how to best design technology to fit within and extend our existing social practices. In this talk, I look at three case studies to illustrate how we can use an understanding of people’s existing social practices and needs to inform technology design.
First, I look at the privacy concerns of telecommuters as they attempt to collaborate and maintain communication with colleagues at the office through video conferencing systems. I discuss findings from a controlled experiment that investigates how awareness needs interplay with privacy concerns when video obfuscation is used to mitigate privacy in the video channel. I then outline a context-aware home video conferencing system as one possible solution to address the needs of telecommuters.
Second, I discuss the coordination challenges families face as they try to schedule and coordinate family activities. I outline findings from ethnographic interviews of families’ calendaring routines and show how this knowledge reveals insights into the design of digital family calendars to fit within and extend existing family practice. I present the design and field evaluation of LINC, a digital family calendar that makes family calendar information ubiquitously accessible wherever family members need it.
Third, I outline the challenges people face with browsing and managing large collections of photos. I describe ethnographic findings that demonstrate the routines families use to organize both film and digital photos. These show the importance of leveraging film photo routines in the digital realm. I then show how these suggestions may be realized within the design of digital photo management software.

About the Speaker
Dr. Carman Neustaedter is a Research Scientist in the Multimedia Systems group at Kodak Research Labs. His research interests are in human-computer interaction with a focus in domestic computing and computer-supported collaboration. In these areas, he seeks to understand the socio-technical factors of ubiquitous technology design to support the everyday social practices of individuals and groups. This multidisciplinary research spans the broad areas of computer science, cultural anthropology, sociology, and social psychology. Carman holds a PhD in Computer Science from the University of Calgary, Canada, and also spent several years working at Microsoft Research as an intern and research contractor.
http://www.carmster.com

COST: Members & Students – no cost; Non-members - $5 payable at the door

RSVP: Contact Jennifer Dyck by December 5, 716-673-3828, Jennifer.Dyck at fredonia.edu

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November 13, 2007

Creating Human Factors Guidance for Complex Human-Machine Systems

Presented by: William F. Stubler, B.S., M.S.
Kodak Graphic Communications Group

Location:
 
RIT Building 70 Room 2400 (B. Thomas Golisano College of Computing and Information Sciences)
5:30pm – 6:30pm. Networking after the meeting, 6:30pm – 7pm.
Park in Lot J. See campus map at http://inside.rit.edu/maps/

Abstract
Medical devices, aircraft cockpits, process control centers, and other complex human-machine systems pose human performance demands that extend well beyond considerations of ease of use and out-of-the-box experience associated with consumer products. Some critical considerations include fault detection and diagnosis, error prevention and containment, system safety, and speed and accuracy for particular maneuvers. Adequate human factors guidance may not exist for these systems, especially where technologies are new or evolving. This paper presents a process for developing valid human factors guidance. Examples will be drawn from a project the author conducted to develop human factors guidelines for software-based controls for the US Nuclear Regulator Commission.

About the Speaker
Bill has been an internal human factors consultant for his entire career. At the Westinghouse Science and Technology Center in Pittsburgh, PA, he conducted research and provided design support for nuclear power plant control rooms and maintenance systems, elevators, escalators, defense systems, office furniture, and office productivity systems. At Brookhaven National Laboratory in Upton, NY, he developed human factors design review guidance for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the US Department of Energy. In 2001, Bill returned home to Rochester, NY to provide human factors and usability support to some smaller-scale process control systems - the NexPress family of digital printing presses – in Kodak’s Graphic Communications Group. Bill holds a BS degree in Industrial Engineering from SUNY at Buffalo and a MS in Human Factors / Engineering Design from Tufts University.

COST: Members & Students – no cost; Non-members - $5 payable at the door

RSVP: Contact Jennifer Dyck by November 6, 716-673-3828, Jennifer.Dyck at fredonia.edu


October 16, 2007

A Method for Evaluating Alternative Product Concepts: A Case Study

Presented by:

Stan Caplan, M.S., CHFP
Usability Associates

Abstract:
A critical point in the development of new products is the early selection of an appropriate concept that serves as the basis for moving forward. Human Factors professionals can play a key role in the selection process by using a method that collects meaningful quantitative and qualitative data from users. The case study presentation will (1) explain the process for generating alternative concepts for a handheld product and (2) highlight the method used to collect and analyze comparative quantitative data about their design and usability features. Actual results will be shown. Attendees will learn about the Mr. Potato Head approach to concept generation and about a modified Pugh method for data collection. They will also hear about lessons learned when doing such a study.

About the Speaker
Stan has been in the Human Factors field for 35 years, most of it at Eastman Kodak Company where he worked initially in workplace ergonomics and then in product design usability. At Kodak he had the opportunity to design usability for a wide range of products. He also supervised a Human Factors group responsible for usability of commercial, health, and ancillary products. For the last 10 years he has been president of Usability Associates. In this consulting capacity he has again helped design consumer, commercial, and medical products, this time for a variety of companies. He also does workshops and special projects, including organizational benchmarking and recruiting of Human Factors professionals for clients. In 2004 he established a consortium of product design and usability managers from Fortune 100 companies and he continues to facilitate consortium meetings and research. He is a past-president of the Western New York Chapter of HFES and is active in the Product Design Technical group of HFES.

COST:

Members & Students – no cost; Non-members - $5 payable at the door

RSVP:

Contact Jennifer Dyck by October 9, 716-673-3828, Jennifer.Dyck at fredonia.edu

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May 8, 2007

Ergonomics in Practice in the Grocery Industry

Presented by:
Paul F. Hickey, M.Ed., CPE
Wegmans

Abstract:
The Grocery Industry is on the OSHA watch list as a potential high hazard industry. OSHA has released Guidelines for Retail Grocery Stores. Paul Hickey will discuss the role of ergonomics in the Grocery Industry to reduce the risk of injuries and will include trends on workstation design, packaging design and material handling.

About the Speaker:
Paul is a Board Certified Professional Ergonomist with over 15 years experience in the prevention, management and rehabilitation of overexertion musculoskeletal injuries, including 10 years at the University of Rochester. He joined Wegmans Food Markets in 1999 and is responsible for ergonomics efforts throughout the organization. He graduated in 1985 from Temple University with a master’s degree in Exercise and Work Physiology. While at the University of Rochester, Paul worked as a community-based Ergonomist through the Department of Occupational and Environmental. He provided ergonomics assistance in a variety of organizations and work situations including office, production, warehousing, health-care and retail industries. His work at Wegmans includes all aspects ergonomics work throughout the grocery chain, including work in the stores, corporate, distribution, and manufacturing. He works on both employee and customer issues. Professional activities include full membership in the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, past president of the Western New York Chapter of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, and lecturer nationally and internationally. He has co-authored articles on ergonomics and occupational rehabilitation in several peer-reviewed journals. He has co-authored a chapter on ergonomics in the Handbook of Pain Assessment and has recently collaborated on a chapter entitled Integrating Ergonomics in the Management of Occupational Musculoskeletal Pain and Disability in Perspectives in Rehabilitation Ergonomics.

DATE/TIME: May 8, 2007 4:30 pm

PLACE: RIT Building 70 Room 2400 (B. Thomas Golisano College of Computing and Information Sciences)   Networking after the meeting. Park in Lot J. See campus map at http://inside.rit.edu/maps/

COST: Members & Students – no cost; Non-members - $5 payable at the door

RSVP: Contact Jennifer Dyck by May 1st, 716-673-3828, jennifer.dyck at fredonia.edu

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April 18, 2007

Making color acceptable to the non expert

Presented by:
Geoff Woolfe, Ph.D. , Principle Research Scientist
Xerox Innovation Group

Abstract:
The explosive growth of digital photography over the last few years and the increasing affordability of high quality color printing and display devices has changed the way people use color in the photography and home imaging markets.

Widespread availability of high quality digital printing presses and printing services, such as Kinkos, have put the power of high quality color commercial printing into the hands of consumers and small business operators. Accordingly, color adjustment, control and management are problems being faced by a greater number of non-experts now, than was customary in the past. Unfortunately, the color application and color management communities have failed to keep pace with the rapid democratization of color technologies. There is an opportunity to open the world of color to an even wider audience if we can develop more understandable, intuitive and simple interfaces to the many complex technologies that underpin today’s color imaging, design and color management applications. This presentation will discuss some of the shortcomings of color interfaces today and propose some new techniques that can make color more accessible to the non-expert.

Color users have an underlying intuitive model of how they believe color works. I addition, they frequently identify colors and color transform intents using fuzzy, qualitative descriptors such as language. Imaging scientists and engineers, on the other hand, develop color algorithms and technologies using a wide variety of precise, numeric color spaces. In too many cases, user interfaces to color applications are designed in a way that requires users to have an understanding of the underlying color spaces used by the application. In order to make these interfaces accessible to non-experts, scientists and engineers need to understand the user’s underlying conceptual color model and develop mappings from this, often fuzzy and qualitative model, to the appropriate numeric color parameters that control the application.

About the Speaker:
Dr. Geoff Woolfe is currently a Principal Research Scientist in the Xerox Innovation Group. He joined Xerox in 2005 after spending a 21 year career in the Kodak Research Laboratories.

Dr. Woolfe received his B.Sc. (Honors) and Ph.D. degrees in Physical Chemistry from the University of Melbourne (Australia) and the M.S. degree in Imaging Science from the Rochester Institute of Technology. He is a member of the Honor Society of Phi Kappa Phi and a member of the Society for Imaging Science and Technology.

Dr. Woolfe is the author of 23 scientific papers and 38 US and international patents and pending patent applications. His current research interests include development of color imaging algorithms, color management, color application usability and color imaging system modeling.

DATE/TIME: April 18, 2007 4:30 pm

PLACE: RIT Building 70 Room 2400 (B. Thomas Golisano College of Computing and Information Sciences)   Networking after the meeting. Park in Lot J. See campus map at http://inside.rit.edu/maps/

COST: Members & Students – no cost; Non-members - $5 payable at the door

RSVP: Contact Jennifer Dyck by April 12th, 716-673-3828, jennifer.dyck at fredonia.edu

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March 28, 2007

A Study of Information Technology in Emergency Departments

Ann Bisantz, Associate Professor Industrial Engineering University at Buffalo, State University of New York

Abstract:
Hospital emergency departments (EDs) commonly use status boards as tools for managing their clinical work. These are typically large format, manually updated “whiteboards” which use a grid format to display bed locations / patients as rows and a variety of important information regarding patient demographic and medical information in columns. A typical ED could not function today without a whiteboard (or some facsimile of one). Interestingly, despite their central importance to the work of the ED and the safety of patients, they have hardly been studied. For a variety of reasons, some EDs have replaced their manual status boards with electronic, computer-supported versions, and many others are contemplating such a change. The motivations for this change are complex, and typically involve improving accuracy of information, providing better information to management or other “back end” processes and improving patient safety. However, insertion of technology into a complex work place like the ED is never a straightforward substitution of one for the other. New technologies sometimes increase workload instead of decreasing it, and the change in tools also induces changes in work practices, in the relationships among workers, and the relationship between the affected unit (the ED) and the rest of the organization.

This talk will describe preliminary analyses of a field study that is being conducted to document and analyze the impacts of the shift from manual to electronic whiteboards in the emergency departments of two hospitals.

About the Speaker
Ann BisantzAnn Bisantz is an Associate Professor of Industrial Engineering at the University at Buffalo, State University of New York. Her areas of research include communicating uncertainty to decision makers using visual and multi-modal displays, methods in cognitive engineering, and modeling dynamic decision-making. Dr. Bisantz is the recipient of a CAREER award from the National Science Foundation, which has supported research activities in the area of visualization of uncertainty and dynamic decision-making, is collaborating on medical technology and patient safety studies funded in part by the Emergency Medicine Foundation and the Agency for Health Care Research on Quality, has received funding from NASA, the Center for Transportation Injury Reduction (through the Calspan-UB Research Corporation), a number of defense organization (through collaborations with Logicon and Charles River Analytics among others) and has been involved collaborative research with the Center for Multi-source Information Fusion at UB.

DATE/TIME: March 28, 2007 4:30 pm

PLACE: RIT Building 70 Room 2400 (B. Thomas Golisano College of Computing and Information Sciences)   Networking after the meeting. Park in Lot J. See campus map at http://inside.rit.edu/maps/

COST: Members & Students – no cost; Non-members - $5 payable at the door

RSVP: Contact Jennifer Dyck by March 21st, 716-673-3828, jennifer.dyck at fredonia.edu

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November 30, 2006

Studying Team Communication and Coordination in Surgery

Stephanie Guerlain, Associate Professor, Department of Systems & Information Engineering - University of Virginia

Abstract

Surgery is a high-risk endeavor that requires communication and coordination amongst many caregivers. In this talk, I will describe several studies that we have performed over the past six years at the University of Virginia Medical Center to better characterize team communication and coordination at an academic teaching hospital. In particular, we have developed a method for observing teams intraoperatively, assisted by an institutionally-developed hardware-software data collection system called Remote Analysis of Team Environments (RATE), which enables audio-recording up to 8 team members while capturing four synchronous video feeds, and enables scoring team communications and case events on the fly which can be used to analyze patterns of behavior or to debrief the team using the digital audiovisual record just collected. We have also developed an inter-rater agreement scoring methodology for this kind of a "running" data set, and examined communication and error patterns as a result. We have evaluated the use of checklists and crew resource management training using these methods, as well as developed an anatomy recognition training package for laparoscopic cholecystectomy (gallbladder removal). For more details about any of these studies, please consult the papers found at http://www.sys.virginia.edu/hci/research.asp

About the Speaker

Stephanie GuerlainStephanie Guerlain, Ph.D., is an Associate Professor with tenure in the Department of Systems and Information Engineering at the University of Virginia. She received her B.S. in Engineering Psychology at Tufts University in 1990 and the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Industrial and Systems Engineering from the Ohio State University in 1993 and 1995 respectively. She has worked as Member of the Technical Staff in the Human-Systems Integration Group at the MITRE Corporation, intern in the Software Development Tools Group at Apple Computer, and Principal Research Scientist in the User-Centered Design Group at Honeywell Technology Center. Her research is in the area of cognitive systems engineering, particularly the design of decision support systems and data visualization in supervisory control domains such as medical, military, and petrochemical. Dr. Guerlain just received a large 5-year training grant from the National Library of Medicine for Medical Informatics, and is thus in search of several graduate students and postdoctoral researchers.

Details

DATE/TIME: November 30, 2006 @ 4:30pm – 5:30pm. Come at 4:00 for networking.

PLACE: RIT Building 70 (B. Thomas Golisano College of Computing and Information Sciences) Room 2400 (Information Technology Conference Room – 2nd floor) Park in Lot J. See campus map at http://inside.rit.edu/maps/

COST: Members & Students – no cost; Non-members - $5 payable at the door

RSVP: Contact the following by November 22nd. Jennifer Dyck, 716-673-3828, Jennifer.dyck at fredonia.edu

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June 7, 2006

Universal Design and Human Factors

Presented by

    Ed Steinfeld, Professor of Architecture - Director, IDEA Center - SUNY/Buffalo

    Sponsored by: Western New York Chapter Human Factors and Ergonomics Society

Abstract

The goal of universal design is to support independence through the built environment, products, communications systems and information technology. There is a strong relationship between human factors and universal design. But, human factors researchers and practitioners need to consider changing methods and approaches to address universal design. Experience in practice, suggests that we need to shift our concept from designing a "prosthetic environment" toward thinking of the environment as a "field of opportunity." This presentation will give an introduction to universal design and a rationale for this change of paradigms. Examples from both research and practice will be presented for discussion.

About the Speaker

Edward Steinfeld, Arch.D., is a registered architect and design researcher with special interests in universal design, accessibility and design for the lifespan. At The State University of New York at Buffalo (UB), he is a Professor of Architecture and Director of the IDEA Center. Dr. Steinfeld has directed over 30 sponsored research projects and has an extensive publication record. Many of his publications are considered key references in the fields of accessible and universal design. He is internationally known for his research and has traveled widely to lecture in many countries. In 2003 received a Distinguished Professor Award from the Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture and has also received awards from the National Endowment for the Arts, the Industrial Design Society of America (IDSA) and Progressive Architecture. Recently, he received a Ron Mace, Designing for the 21st Century Award from Adaptive Environments. He is a frequent consultant to federal and state agencies, building owners and attorneys and has designed several buildings that are home to many people with severe disabilities.

Details

DATE/TIME: June 7, 2006 @ 4:30pm – 5:30pm. Come at 4:00 for networking.

PLACE: RIT Building 70 (B. Thomas Golisano College of Computing and Information Sciences)

  • Room 2400 (Information Technology Conference Room – 2nd floor)
  • Park in Lot J. See campus map at http://inside.rit.edu/maps/.

COST: Members & Students – no cost; Non-members - $5 payable at the door

RSVP: Contact the following by June 2nd.

Jennifer Dyck, 716-673-3828, Jennifer.dyck at fredonia.edu

ALL INTERESTED PARTIES ARE INVITED

The IDEA Center www.ap.buffalo.edu/idea There are lots of resources there, including an entire site devoted to education.

Principles of Universal Design: This is the link for the UDNY book in which we wrote a chapter on the rationale for UD and the Principles with illustrations. This version is focused on the built environment.

http://www.ap.buffalo.edu/idea/udny/

The original Principles are at the site of the Center on Universal Design at NC State:

http://www.design.ncsu.edu/cud/about_ud/udprinciples.htm

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May 10, 2006

How Kodak Reduces Musculoskeletal Risk

Presented by:

  • Nancy Laurie, Product Stewardship Engineer - Design for Health Safety and Environment
  • Grant Esler, Ergonomist, - HSE World-Wide Ergonomics
    Eastman Kodak Company

Sponsored by:

  • Western New York Chapter - Human Factors and Ergonomics Society
  • Western New York Chapter - American Industrial Hygiene Association

Abstract

This session will be an explanation and demonstration of how Kodak's MAG (Musculoskeletal Analysis Guide) package evolved as the core of the Company’s ergonomic job improvement process. This is a comprehensive methodology for musculoskeletal job analysis and improvement. It was developed beginning in 2000 with the objective to enable and incent non-ergonomists to identify high-risk jobs, analyze them, and to develop, implement and track improvements. The presenters will review a case study to demonstrate how the MAG package is used in the overall process to improve jobs at Kodak.

About the Speakers

Nancy LaurieNancy Laurie is a product stewardship engineer for Eastman Kodak Company and is a Certified Professional Ergonomist. She has a PhD in Industrial Engineering with primary focus on mathematical modeling of cumulative trauma disorders at the wrist. She has worked in the field of ergonomics for 15 years with experience in creating sustainable ergonomics programs, teaching, and workplace design incorporating lean manufacturing principles. She joined Eastman Kodak Company in 2000 as a Senior Ergonomist and has had responsibilities within manufacturing in Rochester as well as Europe and Middle East Regions. During her tenure with WW Ergonomics she was the driving force behind the development and automation of the MAG package. Her current role with Kodak focuses on Equipment Commercialization ensuring that newly commercialized products are designed to meet health, safety and environmental regulations worldwide. She partners with Kodak’s Corporate Design and Usability group to better design the physical interface to large scale industrial health equipment.

 

Grant EslerGrant Esler is an ergonomist at Kodak who has served in a variety of health and safety roles for 28 years. Grant was an industrial hygienist, program manager and group leader. He served as Kodak’s Manager of HSE Training and Education. He also served as the HSE Manager for Global Customer Service and Support where he promoted ergonomic design for maintainability for Kodak equipment. He developed programs, developed and delivered training as an HSE Technical Associate for Kodak’s Health Group. Grant is a certified Industrial Hygienist and Certified Safety Professional. He studied Ergonomics at Boston University and the University of Michigan where he earned his MPH. He has been working in this field for the past 5 years, coaching industrial and office clients to implement ergonomic programs that improve jobs.

Details

DATE/TIME: December 14, 2005 @ 4:30pm – 5:30pm. Come at 4:00 for networking.

PLACE: RIT Building 70 (B. Thomas Golisano College of Computing and Information Sciences)

  • Room 2400 (Information Technology Conference Room – 2nd floor)
  • Park in Lot J. See campus map at http://facilities.rit.edu/campus/maps/general/generallarge.gif.

COST: Members & Students – no cost; Non-members - $5 payable at the door

RSVP: Contact the following by May 8th


Photos from May 2006 Meeting. 
Please click the thumbnail to view a larger image.

 

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April 25, 2006

Semiotic Analysis & Narrative Congruence

    Presented by: Charles Leech, Executive VP, Qualitative ABM Research Ltd. Toronto, Canada

    Sponsored by: Western New York Chapter Human Factors and Ergonomics Society

Abstract

Semiotics is the systematic study of signs, symbols, and communication, based on the notion that all human communication is made of a system of texts, requiring decoding. Any form of communication, from architecture and advertising to movies and music videos, can be read as a text, and semiotics precisely outlines each element of the communication and what it connotes to the observer or consumer. Semiotics is particularly effective in decoding very dense communication texts such as advertising, packaging, brand names and logos, enabling marketers to understand the various connotations, implications and nuances of the issue at hand.

This has obvious applications to market research, where semiotics is at the forefront of new qualitative methodologies in North America. Already common in Europe, the demand for semiotic analysis as a methodology is now beginning to grow here, particularly when the objective involves the assessment of creative concepts, brand or product names, or proposed product packaging. Semiotics allows for the systematic analysis and quantification of communication elements previously inaccessible through other methodologies. Semiotic analysis can be undertaken as a solo research initiative between researcher and text, used as an enhancement tool for focus groups moderators, as well as for ethnographers and cultural anthropologists.

Semiotics is also an excellent methodology to apply to product design. The way a product is designed, and the shape and feel of it all communicate information to the consumer above and beyond the product’s literal functionality. Semiotics can offer an assessment of design elements and whether they are congruent with the product’s purpose, category, and target consumer.

Narrative Congruence: occurs when a plurality of narrative texts (storyline, plot, visual image, music, etc.) all communicate the same information about your product/brand/service to the same people at the same time, at the same speed. The result is a very strong communication.

Narrative Congruence is the Holy Grail of leveraged branding.

About the Speaker

Charles holds his Ph.D. in Applied Semiotics and Media Studies from the Queensland University of Technology in Australia, and a cum laude M.A. in Mass Communications Research from the University of Leicester, UK. To the best of his knowledge, Charles is the only formally trained market research semiotician in North America. Semiotics is a specialized market research methodology for understanding verbal, textual, and visual marketing language such as TV creative, brands, and packaging. An acknowledged expert in his field, Charles has spoken and taught extensively on the applications of semiotics to market research to many of his blue chip clients and to professional organizations such as ESOMAR, the QRCA and the MRIA.

Slide Presentation:

Details

DATE/TIME: April 27, 2006 @ 4:30pm – 5:30pm. Come at 4:00 for networking.

  • PLACE: RIT Building 70 (B. Thomas Golisano College of Computing and Information Sciences)
    • Room 2400 (Information Technology Conference Room – 2nd floor)
    • Park in Lot J. See campus map at http://inside.rit.edu/maps/.
  • COST: Members & Students – no cost; Non-members - $5 payable at the door
  • RSVP: Contact the following by April 21st.

Jennifer Dyck, 716-673-3828, Jennifer.dyck at fredonia.edu

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March 29, 2006

Effects of Pace and Work Stress on Sign Language Interpreters

Presented by:  Matt Marshall, Assistant Professor Industrial and Systems Engineering Rochester Institute of Technology

Sponsored by: Western New York Chapter Human Factors and Ergonomics Society

Abstract

Sign language interpreting is an occupation that suffers from high levels of repetitive motions injuries (RMIs) and burnout due to the high physical and cognitive demands of the interpreting task. The objective of this research was to determine the effects of work pace and psychosocial stress on the wrist kinematics of sign language interpreting. It was found that neither pace nor stress affected mean wrist position, but increased pace resulted in significant increase of both mean velocity and acceleration, with increases ranging from 10.7-18.6%. Increased psychosocial stress resulted in significant increase of left-hand (non-dominant) mean velocity and acceleration, with increases ranging from 14.8-19.5%. No effect of stress was observed for the right hand. In addition, several wrist kinematic variables of interpreting exceeded previously established high risk industrial benchmarks. The results of this work support earlier research which found deleterious effects of work stress on the biomechanical responses of the lower back.

About the Speaker

Matt Marshall has been an Assistant Professor in the Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering at RIT since November 2001. Matt teaches courses in ergonomics/biomechanics as well as statistical quality control, and is actively involved in working with manufacturing and service industries in central and western New York to improve workplace ergonomics and safety. He received his Ph.D. in Industrial and Operations Engineering from the University of Michigan in 2002. His dissertation focused on the assessment of forceful exertion in occupational settings, with a particular emphasis on the use of electromyography and psychophysical methods to quantify the magnitude of forceful exertion. Most recently, Matt has completed research to evaluate the effects of psychosocial stress on the biomechanics of the upper extremities.

Details

DATE/TIME: March 29, 2006 @ 4:30pm – 5:30pm. Come at 4:00 for networking.

PLACE: RIT Building 70 (B. Thomas Golisano College of Computing and Information Sciences) Room 2400 (Information Technology Conference Room – 2nd floor) Park in Lot J. See campus map at http://inside.rit.edu/maps/.

COST: Members & Students – no cost; Non-members - $5 payable at the door

RSVP: Contact the following by March 24th. Mike Gerard, 585-726-0399,
Michael Gerard at Kodak.com

ALL INTERESTED PARTIES ARE INVITED

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January 25, 2006

A Case Study of

Applying Work Practice Analysis in Research

Presented by

Nathaniel Martin, Researcher, Xerox Corporation

Sponsored by:

 Western New York Chapter Human Factors and Ergonomics Society

Abstract

During the eighties and nineties anthropologists at Xerox PARC developed an approach to work practice analysis that used ethnography, an anthropological tool, to investigate the culture of the workplace with an eye to developing supporting technology. In 2003, as part of a text mining activity, work practice analysis was applied to the activities of a Xerox employee who claimed to be classifying documents. Standard text mining algorithms classify documents, but the work practice analysis showed that the employee’s notion of classification and the text-mining notion of classification diverged. Using ethnography to analyze the employee’s actual work practices, we discovered a novel approach to text mining. This talk will describe work practice analysis as practiced by ethnographers at the Wilson Center at Xerox and show how this activity led to the development of a novel method of text mining.

About the Speaker

Nat Martin received his BA in Literature from New College, his MS in Computer Science from The University of Florida and his PhD from the University of Rochester. His dissertation combined statistical reasoning with computer based planning. Currently, he is working on data mining and work practice analysis. He is the author of numerous papers and patents.

Details

DATE/TIME: Jan 25, 2006 @ 4:30pm – 5:30pm. Come at 4:00 for networking.

PLACE: RIT Building 70 (B. Thomas Golisano College of Computing and Information Sciences)

  • Room 2400 (Information Technology Conference Room – 2nd floor)

  • Park in Lot J. See campus map at http://inside.rit.edu/maps/.

  • COST: Members & Students – no cost; Non-members - $5 payable at the door

  • RSVP: Contact the following by January 23rd

Nate Romano, 585-726-0049, nathan.romano at kodak.com

ALL INTERESTED PARTIES ARE INVITED

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February 23, 2006

WNYHFES Happy Hour

Presented by and sponsored by:

WNYHFES Western New York Chapter

Human Factors and Ergonomics Society

Abstract

Human Factors can be applied to all areas of interaction. This event will focus on the application of user-centered design principles to social milieus with an eye toward the maximization of user delight and appeal. This talk will focus on specific issues such as the optimum design for a food plate to hold the maximum amount of chicken wings in both with drink and without drink conditions, as well as the ergonomic comfort and its effect on performance for items such as pool cue sticks and darts. Multiple within subject experiments are planned.

Details

DATE/TIME: February 23, 2006 @ 4:30pm – 6:00pm.

  • PLACE: MacGregor’s Grill & Tap Room, 300 Jefferson Road (down the road from RIT).
  • COST: No Cost – Soda and Finger Foods (vegetables, chicken wings) will be provided
  • RSVP: Contact the following by February 20.

Nate Romano, 585-726-0049, nathan.romano at kodak.com

ALL INTERESTED PARTIES ARE INVITED

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November 16, 2005

It’s an Ergonomic World – or Is It?

Presented by:

Professor Alan Hedge,

Department of Design and Environmental Analysis

Cornell University

Sponsored by:

Western New York Chapter,  Human Factors and Ergonomics Society

Abstract

This talk will discuss what it really means for a product to be an "ergonomic product" and it will present examples of products marketed as being "ergonomic" but of questionable design. Reasons for lack of consistent criteria for evaluating ergonomic products will be considered. Five simple principles for determining how "ergonomic" any product design is will be presented.

About the Speaker

Alan Hedge is a Professor in the Department of Design and Environmental Analysis, Cornell University and a Research Professor  in the Department of Biomedical and Chemical Engineering at Syracuse University. At Cornell, since 1987, he has directed the Human Factors and Ergonomics teaching and research programs and he also is co-director of the Design Concepts Laboratory in the department. Prior to joining Cornell, for over 10 years he ran the Graduate Program in Applied Psychology and Ergonomics at Aston University, Birmingham, U.K. From 1990-1993 he was also an Honorary Research Fellow at the Institute of Occupational Health, University of Birmingham, U.K.

His research and teaching activities have focused on issues of design and workplace ergonomics as these affect the health, comfort and productivity of workers. He has co-authored a book on  Healthy Buildings, co-edited the Handbook of  Human Factors and Ergonomics Methods, published 30 chapters and over 160 articles on these topics in the ergonomics and related journals. He received the 2003 Alexander J. Williams Jr. Design Award from the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society for " outstanding human factors contributions to the design of a major operational system".

Details

DATE/TIME: November 16, 2005 @ 4:30pm – 5:30pm. Come at 4:00 for networking.

PLACE: RIT Building 70 (B. Thomas Golisano College of Computing and Information Sciences)

    Room 2400 (Information Technology Conference Room – 2nd floor)

    Park in Lot J. See campus map at http://facilities.rit.edu/campus/maps/general/generallarge.gif.

COST: Members & Students – no cost; Non-members - $5 payable at the door

RSVP: Contact the following by November 14th

Stan Caplan, 585-442-0499, mailto:scaplan at usabilityassociates.com

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October 20, 2005

Ease of Use the Primary Motivator for

A Visual Intelligence User Interface

Presented by

Steven L. Schultz, Chief Technical Officer

Brian C. Jackson, Director of Technical Services

Pictometry International Corp

Sponsored by:

Western New York Chapter Human Factors and Ergonomics Society

Abstract

Pictometry is a local company with international customers. Various government agencies in the U.S. and elsewhere purchase Pictometry’s product because it is a unique patented information system that combines aerial imaging with a state of the art software system that has the ability to provide Visual Intelligence™ unlike any other system available. While Pictometry libraries contain orthogonal (straight down) images like ordinary aerial imaging, over 80% of Pictometry's images are oblique (taken from angles) so that features can be easily seen in their entirety. Within seconds, using Pictometry's Electronic Field Study (EFS) software, a user can literally see everywhere, measure anything and plan everything. This means that clients can literally view and analyze any house, building, intersection, fire hydrant, tree or any feature in their county from their laptop or workstation. Features can be viewed from at least three and up to twelve different directions. The images are all in a full color, high resolution, digital format. Pictometry does not utilize or produce authoritative or definitive information (surveying) from its aerial images, but is a second order visualization tool that supports the many needs of its customers in their market segments.

Pictometry International Corp's Electronic Field Study(tm) software (EFS(tm)) has been designed with ease of use in mind with the goal of allowing anyone and everyone to utilize imagery and geospatial data in their daily tasks. This is achieved by hiding as much of the technical information as possible and making the measuring tools simple and intuitive. Pictometry and its software have garnered awards and praise from the industry for its ability to achieve these goals.

About the Speaker

Stephen was in the RIT Computer Science undergraduate program and Imaging Science graduate program. He worked for 11 years at the Chester F. Carlson Center for Imaging Science before leaving to start Pictometry in 1996. He has been guiding Pictometry ever since.

Details

DATE/TIME: October 20, 2005 @ 4:30pm – 5:30pm. Come at 4:00 for networking.

PLACE: RIT Building 70 (B. Thomas Golisano College of Computing and Information Sciences)

    Room 2400 (Information Technology Conference Room – 2nd floor)

    Park in Lot J. See campus map at http://facilities.rit.edu/index.asp?page=map.asp.

    COST: Members & Students – no cost; Non-members - $5 payable at the door

    RSVP: Contact the following by Oct 18th

        Nate Romano, 585-726-0049, nathan.romano at kodak.com

PLEASE POST and feel free to invite other interested parties

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September 15, 2005

A Double Header:

Papers Slated for Presentation at HFES Annual Meeting

Presented by:

Professor Colin Drury

Department of Industrial Engineering, SUNY - Buffalo

Sponsored by:

Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, Western New York Chapter

Abstracts

Analysis of Collaborative Meetings in Developing Data Mining Models

Observations of group meetings were used to help our understanding of the Data Mining (DM) process which can take a year to complete. Over a course of three months, we followed two collaborative groups and observed their weekly meetings, where they devised DM models and explored new ways to analyze and present microarray data. The study furthered the current understanding of the DM activities by revealing its socio-technical aspects, and directed a promising design approach for a more efficient and effective DM system. Field observations of collaborative meetings disclosed that a longitudinal study is, in fact, appropriate and necessary to further understand the DM process and the system.

Language Error in Aviation Maintenance: Data from Asia

English is the language of aviation, including aviation maintenance. As more maintenance work is outsourced to non-English-speaking countries, language error may be a problem. A study of 254 maintenance personnel at nine sites in Chinese-speaking countries measured the reported incidences of seven scenarios and tested intervention effectiveness. Four of the scenarios had reported incidence of 4-5 per year, and the expected causal factors were reported. A test of interventions to work documentation revealed that participants tended to maintain a constant level of accuracy and speed to produce this level. A Chinese translation of the document was the only significant intervention, giving about a 10% speed advantage.

About the Speaker

Colin G. Drury is UB Distinguished Professor of Industrial Engineering at University at Buffalo, where his work is concentrated on the application of human factors techniques to manufacturing and maintenance processes. Since 1989 he has been leading a team applying human factors techniques to reduce errors in aviation maintenance and inspection: the Research Institute for Safety and Security in Transportation (RISST). Formerly Manager of Ergonomics at Pilkington Glass, he has over 200 publications on topics in industrial process control, quality control, aviation maintenance and safety. He was the founding Executive Director of The Center for Industrial Effectiveness, which works with regional industries to improve competitiveness and has been credited with creating and saving thousands of jobs in the region. He is a Fellow of the Institute of Industrial Engineers, the Ergonomics Society, the International Ergonomics Association and the Human Factors Ergonomics Society, and received the Bartlett medal of the Ergonomics Society and the Fitts Award of the Human Factors Ergonomics Society. He has a private pilot's license.

Details

DATE/TIME: Sept 15, 2005 @ 4:30pm – 5:30pm. Come at 4:00 for networking.

PLACE: RIT Building 70 (B. Thomas Golisano College of Computing and Information Sciences)

    Room 2400 (Information Technology Conference Room – 2nd floor)

    Park in Lot J. See campus map at http://facilities.rit.edu/index.asp?page=map.asp.

COST: Members & Students – no cost; Non-members - $5 payable at the door

RSVP: Contact the following by Sept 13th

      Stan Caplan, 585-442-0499, mailto:scaplan at usabilityassociates.com


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